Why My Family’s Cost of Living is Cheaper in Tokyo

Why My Family’s Cost of Living is Cheaper in Tokyo


Hello world! Here’s the thing. I moved from Vancouver, Canada, to Tokyo, Japan. In Canada, I used to make more money, yet my quality of life is somehow better
across the Pacific ocean. This is largely in part due to the cost of living
being cheaper for my family. How could this be, in one of the most
expensive cities in the world Well the first thing you need to know about the cost of living reports about Tokyo you see touted in the news, is that it was probably from the likes
of the Mercer Report, or the Economist Intelligence Unit, which I’ll quote “The survey itself is a purpose-built Internet tool designed to help human resources
and finance managers calculate cost-of-living allowances and
build compensation packages for expatriates and business travellers.” In other words, those reports are meant for
high-flying business people, with the expectation that they can live
their same New York lifestyle in any one of the comparison cities. The report is pegged to the US dollar and it’s for a basket of goods that you would never buy if you lived like a local. What this means is that while a currency of a country
might go up and down, making it cheaper or more expensive
in any given reporting year, if you’re a local, this would have way
less of an effect on you. Currency fluctuations are a big reason why Tokyo was not even in the top 10 one year, then the most expensive city the next. So what is the reality for the average Japanese family? Is it expensive living in Japan, living in Tokyo? So, I went to the statistical agencies of both
Canada and Japan, and boy, did I have fun with charts. If you love stats, get ready for an action packed video! I just love scrolling through them. So much data! Haha, I’m messing with all of you. I did in fact look at all these charts, but I realized that in the end, there were a few major differences
that were the most important to point out. In general, housing in major Japanese cities
is cheaper than in Canada, especially if you consider homes within a 30-60
minute commuting distance to the core and the number of people living in the cities. But why? A couple important factors are
housing sizes and zoning. Japanese homes are smaller, so they cost less. The average new Japanese home is about
1,000 square feet, or about 100 square metres, whereas it’s about double that at 2,000 square feet,
or 200 square metres, in Canada. It’s not only the overall size of housing though, it’s the available configurations. In Japan, you can get housing as small as 10 square metres, which is roughly 100 square feet, up to really, any size you want. This means that people are more able
to sacrifice the size of their living space in order to get closer to where they want to be. This also makes it so that you don’t need
to get roommates or tenants in order to afford a particular space. This variety in housing sizes is largely aided
by zoning laws, which are less restrictive in Japan. Zoning, if you’re not all into urban planning, is the set of rules that say what kind of buildings can be built in certain zones, and what they can be used for. Japanese zoning laws are mostly controlled
at the national level, and allows for homes to be built almost anywhere on practically any size or shape of land. This permits the housing market to self-solve and build the types of buildings that fit the demands of any particular area. So all told, for a budget between
$1,000 and $2,000 Canadian a month, a family can either afford to buy or rent an apartment or stand alone home within a 30-60 minutes commute
of the downtown core of Tokyo. Oh, right, silly me, using Canadian figures. In the default global currency, the U.S. dollar, this is roughly between $750 and $1,500 a month. Another part of the housing equation is utilities, like energy, water, and gas. While Japan is much more expensive than in Canada, Japanese use less in all of these categories, meaning the end amount of money spent
isn’t much different. So the great thing about living in the Tokyo area, is you don’t need to own a car. The public transportation system is such that it’ll probably be easier to take a train to work. Also, most employers will pay
your transportation fees. But what about shopping? Wouldn’t a car be good for that? Most of the things you need, from grocery stores, to household goods, to doctors, are within walking or biking distance. On top of that, getting things delivered
is generally free or very affordable. And delivery is so extensive, that unless you’re shopping for something specialized, if you really wanted to, you don’t have to leave the house for many things. For example, I used to love to go to the giant
electronic store Yodobashi Camera in Akihabara. It’s many, many floors or electronic goodness, But when you can get free, same day delivery, it’s actually more expensive and time consuming
to leave the house. So I hardly go any more. So with company subsidized public transit
and cheap deliveries, the Japanese person’s budget for transportation is significantly less than the Canadian person’s. Now in some rural places,
owning a car would be a necessity, but then housing would be much more affordable, and in some cases, it’s near free. The downside to Japan’s public transportation is that it’s pricey. You get good quality, but you pay for it. For example, if I want to travel
to the other side of town and back, I’d be looking to spend about $10 to $15 US dollars. And if you add some family members to that equation, getting somewhere can easily be more expensive
than a restaurant meal. Even though a car is not a necessity
for most living in Tokyo, about half of all households own a vehicle, but it’s generally more of a luxury than a necessity. Elementary school in Japan starts at grade 1, so when children are 6 years old. Children younger than that fall under
the daycare or preschool system. In Vancouver, I was regularly paying about
$800 US dollars a month. And this was even for unlicensed facilities
run out of people’s homes. In Edogawa, on the Eastern edge of Tokyo, the maximum amount for a licensed daycare for 0 to 2 year olds is $500 US dollars a month. This fees drop as income does, all the way to zero. More importantly, past 2 years old, that price more than halves, to $200 USD a month. And if you have multiple kids under elementary school age, your second kid’s price will be dropped in half. And even, even more amazingly there’s a have two get the rest free policy. All additional kids enrolled are
completely paid for by the government. In general, I would say the quality of care was excellent. I think we did luck out with our teacher, who remained with my son’s class
for the entire 3 years he attended. But again, since these are publicly regulated facilities, not home-based businesses, I think the quality of care is much more consistent
that what I found in Vancouver, where it can be a huge struggle
to get anyone to take care for your child, let alone get a licensed facility. The Japanese facilities also have a school nurse and come with an in-house food program, where food is made fresh on the daily. Field trips were common, there was a good outdoor space to play, and little walks to local parks were frequent. The big downside to childcare programs like this in Japan is the availability of space. Whether your kids can get in or not kind of depends on the need. The more need you have, the more points you have, and the more likely you are to get into a space. Where we were located, there wasn’t a problem getting
into a privately run but publicly regulated daycare. However, in certain wards of the city, some people have no option but to go
to unlicensed facilities, which cost more like $1,000 USD a month. If you can get in, it’s great, and affordable. If not, those childcare costs can add up. The next thing I’ll talk about isn’t a major cost difference, but since the way it’s done is a bit different than Canada, and I know quite different than the United States, I thought it’d be good to talk about health care. Japan has universal health care coverage, with all residents required to get health insurance. Although I have read about 10% of people that
should get insurance don’t. But that’s for a different video. If you work as an employee, then your employer will split your
monthly premium with you. In effect, you’ll pay about 5-6% of your income for the health insurance portion, but double that if you’re self-employed like me. Okay, I was going to do motion graphics for the rest of this health care costs explanation, but I realized it’d be no better than me just talking to the camera. Anyway, paying the monthly insurance premium is one thing but you still have to pay every single time
you visit the doctor, and you have to pay 30%. Gasp! 30%! Yeah, well, the cost is actually not that bad. For example, I visited our local doctor and it cost $5 to renew the prescription. And I don’t think I’ve ever paid much more than $20 for any of my visits. For the insurance premiums, and the co-payments, there are monthly and annual limits, as well as provisions for the elderly, for people with disabilities, for children, for people on low income, so in effect, if you’re poor, you can still get coverage and you never really have to worry about going
bankrupt due to medical bills. While I do have to pay to visit the doctor in Japan, something that is free in Canada, in Canada you still have to pay
a lot of other medical expenses such as prescriptions, dental, and vision. Under Japan’s national public health insurance scheme, the government controls the prices of all procedures performed and medications prescribed by hospitals and clinics. The result is that prescriptions, dental, and vision are all significantly cheaper in Japan than in Canada. Plus my kids are completely covered for all that stuff. If you total up all the costs, I don’t think there’s much of a difference between health care in Canada and Japan, if you’re a regular employee. However, I’m self-employed, so I do think it costs my family maybe a couple hundred dollars a month extra Overall, I’d say the cost of living for my family is less in Japan than it is in Canada, with the big cost differences being childcare, transportation, and housing. If you look at the charts of what
Canadians spend their money on, housing and transportation are the two
biggest budget line items. I should more of a habit of saying this, but links to the sources can be found in the description. For nearly every single topic I covered, I have a video that kind of shows the experience. So I’ve made a playlist which I’ll link to in the description that shows you kind of the everyday living in Japan. As always, thanks to all those that support me on Patreon and I’ll be making a more detailed talk-to-camera video about a Japanese family’s income and expenses on the X channel. Wait, why didn’t I just say vlog? Thanks for watching, see you next time, bye! What’s the cost of living like where you’re from?

100 Comments

  1. Life Where I'm From says:

    Lots of little things I wanted to say, so here's a numbered list!
    1. First things first. My "Being Japanese" documentary I'm trying to get off the ground has 7 days left in the crowdfunding campaign. Perks start at $5, I'm really excited, and I've already started collecting stories https://igg.me/at/lwif-being-japanese-documentary/x
    2. This cost of living video is kind of part 2 of my quality of life video https://youtu.be/oqh2F9Xeqx8
    3. I actually made a whole playlist with a bunch of videos that will help illustrate what the quality of life is like in Japan, from childcare centres to tours of homes https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwBDd34gIIWm7pg8ZdqHPjfXxjxE1Z75q
    4. I was purposely not trying to get into too much details, because there are so many variables, from location to lifestyle. I started collecting all that kind of data, but it got messy so fast, that I chose to focus in on the three main cost differences I found between life in Vancouver vs. Tokyo. I am working on a more messy, discussiony video on the X channel. If you have questions, just leave them below.
    5. Overall, Japanese households make less money, but they also have less expenses. I have a suspicion that for the bottom 20%, the quality of life is better in Japan, but that's a whole other series of videos that I will be investigating.
    6. The overall thing that still impresses me about the 23 wards of Tokyo (9 million), Tokyo Metropolis (13 million), and the Tokyo Metropolitan area (37 million), is that housing is so varied in pricing for all income levels, from public housing, to micro apartments, to full blown custom houses. I really wish Canada had a simple national zoning policy that allowed for more mixed use and more density. For major cities like Toronto and Vancouver, it's so hard for all but those at the top to make a go at it nowadays.
    7. I tried very hard to get all the details correct, sources are in the description. I really hope I didn't misrepresent anything.

  2. cia tronic says:

    ur not even neutral

  3. Happy Cat Lady says:

    Wow! Thank you so much for making this video! My husband and I are considering moving to Japan for work within the next couple of years and was concern about health care, housing, etc. This is great information! Thank you! ☺️

  4. Lim Lim says:

    Come to Singapore.
    The cheapest in the world.

  5. Yo Ben says:

    5k usd per month was like 75million in my currency. Tokyo hell no. Imma report this for misleading

  6. YamiKazeSora says:

    I’m from the Midwest and it’s still expensive in my case lol

  7. Kyle Nichols says:

    The tax rate is like 50 percent in Japan…

  8. Eric Young says:

    Hmmm I donno, a bag of three medium sized onions cost me more than 150yen

  9. Eric Young says:

    Typically tech goods are almost 1.5 times the price. At least computer goods

  10. creativefeather says:

    I hope that lady at 2:49 gets where she's going on time!

  11. MildeAmasoj says:

    In Italy health care is quite cheap; you get almost total discounts for meds if you actually have serious illnesses (I don’t have severe asthma, but since the inhaler was prescribed to be by a medic, I pay 4€ instead of about 50€);
    education is technically free, until high school; there is a tax to pay each year of about a 100€, but there can be an exemption for low-income families;
    university is quite cheap and again, it depends on income, the higher the income the higher the annual fee; if the family has a low income the State will give them money to buy books; since uni is so cheap here scholarships are actually very rare and awarded only in very few cases;
    the cost of living changes wildly from south to north, with the north being a lot more expensive then the south; food, housing, everything is cheaper in the south; I’m from the south but I’m studying in central Italy and the prices are already higher than what I’m used to, but not excessively.

    Hope you can visit Italy!

  12. dragonlaughing says:

    Wow! It looks feasible to visit for awhile!

  13. Jack Wright-Jones says:

    >Have to pay premiums
    Laughs in British

  14. XianKai says:

    Excellent and informational video with fantastic footage! Thank you sir for your research on the cost of living and differences from Canada and the US!

  15. thomasucc says:

    What ! Here in Ireland 750-1000 would get you a one bed apartment the size of a shoe box

  16. One Journey says:

    🎬 1 📽 🎞 🗣 🎙 🌎🌍🌏 ★★★★★ Beautiful 📚 🗺 📍📱🗣 Outstanding thank you for sharing❗️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 🏢 🏡 🏘 🏗 Lovely Views. One Journey 🗺 Let's Make It Count❗️
    🏡Japan housing and neighborhoods look UGLE and JUNKIE.
    🏡The neighborhoods look unattractive and STRESSFUL…
    🏡It does not look scenic just JUNKY…CLUTTERED…DULL unpleasant to eye MIND, and senses. The sidewalk through the community look INDUSTRIAL just ugly, unpleasant
    🏡The stores SPILL OUT into the STREET

  17. arafat Bangladesh says:

    Can you tell me which camera or phone u use to make videos?

  18. Bill says:

    Greg, come to California. The cost of living will drive you insane.

  19. Stephen Melewski says:

    The cost of living sucks. It leads me to think about maybe not living, but I don't really want to die either. I don't want to live like this, but I don't want to die. The cost of living doesn't make sense.

  20. itsjustpedro says:

    I'm brazilian, resident of this beautiful country, but boy, i have never had that so called "american dream". I've always wanted to live in Japan. Your videos keep my dream alive! Thank you so much kep it up.

  21. arain764niara says:

    Who would be shocked with $5? I pay $30 to visit the doctor

  22. Nathaniel Carreon says:

    Southern CA is not that expensive if you bought your house decades ago.

  23. Name says:

    My favorite part was, "Have two, get the rest free." That made me laugh.

  24. NoBoDy GaMeR says:

    wow that is awesome information!

  25. mondilein says:

    You could probably fit 500 Japanese into an average Canadian house and about 1000 into a Punjabi house. 🤣
    An average Canadian family has two or more cars, which require insurance and gas. And with the distances and not great infrastructure outside of Vancouver one really does need a car! Especially getting the groceries from the huge stores that are not around the corner most of the time.
    In Canada good quality food is also quite expensive. And even the regular food (non organic, fake cheese etc) is expensive compared to Europe. How about food costs in Japan?

  26. pharlock says:

    CAD$1000-2000/m for housing is expensive, I think your perspective is skewed coming from Vancouver.

  27. Katherine K says:

    5:28 Ai-chan looks so grown up!

    I find that live in London is a good deal cheaper than in Vancouver (born @ Burnaby General, grew up in North Delta) and much of what you spoke on re: child care and health care is similar between London and Tokyo. NHS (health care) in England is free for landed immigrants/permanent residents and nationals (immigrants who are on visas must pay a pre determined amount when they apply for their visa)… if one has an ailment from a list of qualifying ailments (diabetes or thyroid issues are two), then medicines are free in England while others must pay for prescriptions (~£8.80/CAD $15.50/USD $11.60 per item). Dental is subsidised to a point and is charged on a 3 band system, depending on the work to be performed; optometry care is way cheaper here than in Vancouver.. I can often get an eye exam for free, if I look online to see if anyone is offering free eye exams – generally, I've not paid more than about £20.

    As far as childcare goes, for toddlers between the ages of 2-4 from low income families, child care is free; for children who are 3-4 years old with 1 working parent, they qualify for 15 hours of nursery per week… if both parents work and are each earning above a predetermined minimum threshold, then the child(ren) qualify for 30 hours per week… if families (such as my own) have only one parent working (I've been a stay at home mom up to now), some nurseries will allow parents to top up the free nursery provision out of pocket, enabling the kids to stay full days during the week… not all facilities allow this top-up and will only accept fully funded children to stay the entire day while those on half provision leave at lunch time and of the places that do accept top up, the top up amount is set by the individual nursery (I'm hoping to find some form of employment this spring/summer so that my soon-to-be 3 year old will be fully sponsored when she starts nursery in September).

    Reception Class, which is similar to what Canadians know as junior kindergarten, starts when the child is 4 and is not mandatory, but most kids attend anyway, as it's fully funded by the government… compulsory schooling starts at Year 1 (equivalent to kindergarten in Canada), when the child is 5.

    It can be difficult to get into a good state school (even in London and even at the primary level!) and is usually dependent on how close the family lives to the school, amongst other factors (siblings already in attendance/if the child is in foster care or has been adopted/special educational needs etc) that determines the likelihood of one getting in to the school of their choice, if the school receives more applications than they have places (our daughter is an only child and we are hopeful that we live close enough to the school we'd like her to attend that she'll be offered a place for September 2020).

    Quite like in Japan, the children here in the UK wear a uniform to school, regardless of whether it's an independent/private school or a state/public school, starting from Reception – a pinafore and blouse and tie [in school colours, and on an elastic, for easy removal] for the girls in the winter and a cotton gingham dress in the summer; and a shirt and tie, long pants and a pull over for the boys in the winter; short pants in the spring/summer … some Nursery schools have a uniform as well (usually jogging pants and a sweat shirt with the school logo on the chest) but it's up to the school to decide on the policy (those that don't opt for uniform just have the kids attend dressed similarly to how their Canadian counterparts would be dressed). Secondary school students wear a blazer, shirt/blouse and tie with a skirt for the girls and long pants for the boys.

  28. theStorykeeper says:

    I appreciate the point you were trying to make that people often don't get (and according to my brief peruse through the comments, still aren't getting) that "universal health care" does not mean everyone is covered and everything is free – or even cheaper. When I was in Canada I had to pay the full cost of my glasses and contacts, and the contact exam fee. The only eyecare that was covered was the basic eye exam. I don't consider having to pay the full cost to be able to see to be "free health care"! In comparison, my insurance in the US covers everything but a ~$20 copay for the exam and half the cost of contacts or glasses. If health care in Canada/Japan/etc. was really universally (pun intended) better than the US, then I shouldn't even be able to get better coverage in the US.

    Edited to add: Also, I find most people in the US quote the before insurance price of health services as their cost while people outside US only mention the final cost, so it becomes impossible to compare actual costs.

  29. Stuart M. says:

    I live in a very cheap part of Japan (Hokkaido but not Sapporo). I often travel to California to visit my American family and am shocked at how expensive everything is. Maybe gasoline is cheaper there but a full tank of gas in my Dad's Ford Crown Victoria costs way more than a full tank in my Daihatsu.

  30. Olivetti says:

    par tic a ler

  31. yooser naime says:

    Japan can have you.

  32. Barbara Horovitz says:

    Why go through all that??? come back!!!

  33. Alex Taylor says:

    I AM A CAREFUL LISTENER, SO I CAUGHT THAT PART ABOUT THE JAPANESE USING LESS ELECTRICITY AND GAS. THIS MEANS THOSE ARE VERY EXPENSIVE, FORCING JAPANESE PEOPLE TO HAVE TO DRESS FOR THE OUTSIDE IN THEIR INTERIORS IN WINTER, AND TO SWEAT IT OUT IN THE SUMMER. AND I ALSO CAUGHT THE PART ABOUT TRANSPORTATION COSTING MORE THAN LUNCH.

  34. The Aspergian Heteroclite says:

    Yawn. Middle-class tripe.

  35. Trevor Random says:

    ♥ 🇯🇵

  36. Kurtis Smith says:

    I'm curious how common cantonese is in Tokyo, could you get around sufficiently?

  37. romeocornell69 says:

    Lol have 2 get the rest free. 😂😂

  38. summaiyah arshad says:

    This was beautiful and concise. You've earned a subscriber in me! ^^ Thank you sooo much for this and the time you put into it! <3

  39. fij 01i says:

    Japan is not cheap for good living , it's still expensive from the past till now. It's up to your money.
    If you have little money , Japan is HELL for you. Every country in the world can be paradise for you if you are rich people. Not be rich , don't come to Japan. That's it. Money is the answer , other later.

  40. archangle12otaku says:

    The lady running at 2:50

  41. Joshua DiMaggio says:

    This video kind of doesn't help me I live in Pennsylvania USA a past landlord I had flat out said living here is way cheaper then where he was from Québec Canada so sounds like Japan is out for me

  42. jaguarpawz says:

    Bye bye dont let the door hit in the back

  43. sandy hernandez says:

    *watches video
    – moves to Tokyo after 😂😂😂😂

  44. Not SoTechnical says:

    I always wonder how much you get paid working in Japan with the low cost of living…. The US has minimum wage of at least $8? What’s the minimum wage in Japan?

  45. silvslim says:

    This is reflective of your home area in Vancouver (and Toronto), but definitely not the rest of Canada. You can get a small home under 500k, with a 78k salary in most Canadian cities. Vancouver, Toronto and Calgary don’t reflect the norm for the country.

  46. Tahta says:

    Cost of food is one of the major reasons too. What can we eat under $10 for lunch in North America? None!! Pho used to be the one 5 years ago but not anymore. In Japan, you can eat a delicious full meal for under $10 anywhere. There are even $5 lunch places. I also find the vet bill is 5~10 times more expensive here in Canada. Same as the pet insurance. I m too scared to take our pets to the vet because the money they charge is beyond crazy…

  47. Prisc T says:

    We miss the kids! Great video tho 👍🏽😊😊😊

  48. god says:

    i mean you do look like youre from japan decent with a mixture of mexican decent

  49. Happy angel says:

    California sucks .

  50. Hunts By Chainsaw says:

    Unless you want to own and drive a car. I will say the child care facilities and fees seem so very much better than what's available where I'm at.

  51. Cess Outdoors says:

    Japan looks too crowded for me, Greetings from Germany.

  52. Scifi FantasyGirl says:

    How are the wait times for family doctors visits and specialists when compared to Canada? It's known we have doctor shortages, at least here in Ontario. A scheduled doctor's visit can take up to two weeks and for a specialst it can take 6-8 months or longer.

  53. Ulysses says:

    So my fellow Americans. Please explain: Even the poor can get healthcare in Japan. The medical bills won´t bankrupt you.
    How is this stalinist/marxist/socialist/communist system possible in hyper-capitalist Japan?

  54. Hasan says:

    Lol, bread is for business people?

  55. Tobi Jones says:

    what about taxes. income tax, sales tax etc.?

  56. Anthony Preece says:

    I must ask. Your opinion about a healthy OLDER person retiring to Japan. I love the whole Japanese attitude, The respect, The cleanliness and respect just to name a few things. SO I'd appreciate your opinion.Thanks

  57. ya yaya says:

    BECAUSE NATIONALIST SOCIALIST SOVEREIGN JAPANESE PEOPLE HAVE NOT ALLOWED THEMSELVES TO BE OVERRUN WITH BRITISH GLOBALISM/ COLONIALISM/ COMMUNISM RAMPANT SINCE 1960 IMMIGRATION FRAUDS ON AN ALREADY OVERFULL PLANET, ENDLESS GROWTH ECONOMICS INVASIONS OF WHOLELY UNREQUIRED AND UNDESIRED GREEDY 3RD WORLDERS AND TROPICALS WHO ARE NOT HELD ACCOUNTABLE TO, AND DO NOT, CREATE NICETY FOR THEMSELVES IN THEIR OWN PLACES UNDER THE BASIS OF NATION/BORDERS/GOVERNMENT FINALLY LEGITIMIZED FOR EACH SIMILAR PEOPLE LAST CENTURY AT THEIR DEMAND. ONCE GETTING WHAT THEY WANTED, NOW MORE THAN EVER TRYING TO EMULATE OTHERS AND ESCAPE TO THEIR PLACES. INSTEAD INCESSANTLY MANIPULATING TO INVADE AND TAKE FROM THE NICETY AND MODERATION THAT OTHER RACES/TRIBES CREATED FOR THEMSELVES AND THEIR OWN. ONLY BRINGING THEIR WELL DEMONSTRATED NATURAL PATTERNS OF OVERPOPULATION, UNAFFORDABILITY, DYSFUNCTION, BANKRUPTCY, DISUNITY, INTOLERABLE LOW QUALITY EXISTENCE EVERYWHERE THEY GO, IN DIRECT PROPORTION TO THEIR POPULATION. GREEDY 3RD WORLDER CORRUPTED HERITAGES ALREADY IRREPARABLY DAMAGED CANADIANS, AMERICANS, EUROPEAN RACES/TRIBES HOMELANDS, NOW RUN TO JAPAN TO PARASITE FROM THEM. AND AFTER JAPAN, THEN WHERE IS LEFT FOR THE GREEDY 3RD WORLDERS AND TROPICALS TO LEACH FROM ? THEY DONT CARE, AS LONG AS THEY THINK IT IS, AND FELL THAT THEY ARE, BETTER THAN THEIR OWN PEOPLE AND HOMELANDS THEY SELL OUT IN THE NAME OF MONEY AND MATERIAL TAKEN FROM OTHER PEOPLES PLACES. ITS ALL RIGHT OUT IN THE OPEN PLAIN AS DAY, THEIR GREEDY BLATANT DISRESPECT FOR OTHERS PEOPLES NATIONS/CULTURES/HERITAGES, EXACTLY WHY THEY ARE INCAPABLE, EVEN AFTER CENTURIES OF GUIDANCE AND ASSISTANCE, AND DECADES OF UBIQUITOUS INTERNET INFORMATION GIVEN TO ALL, STILL CANNOT SIMPLY COPY WHATEVER SUCCESSES OF OTHERS THEY WANT IN THEIR OWN PLACES. THESE MINDLESS DO NOT CARE IF THEY TURN IT INTO ANOTHER HONG KONG, SINGAPORE, LONDON, PARIS, GIZA, CONSTANTINOPLE, OVERRUN BY GREEDY 3RD WORLDERS/TROPICALS WHO TRY TO MAKE CLAIMS TO THE MYSTERIOUS ADVANCED PEOPLE/CULTURE/HERITAGE THAT CREATED THE PLACE WHOSE REMNANTS NOW REMAIN IN A CULTURELESS, MINDLESS CONSUMING, FLAWED SOCIETY OF DRONES WHO THINK THEY ARE EMULATING THE ORIGINAL CREATORS WHO MADE THE NICE PLACES/SYSTEMS/INFRASTRUCTURE FROM WILDERNESS, JUNGLE, DESERTS, SWAMPS.

  58. Niki 9ine says:

    Why do so many Canadians move to japan ?

  59. Walter Howard says:

    I had the same experience in reverse. I returned to the US, started making more money but didn't see my lifestyle improve all.

  60. coffeetime1001 says:

    Wow. Jealous for someone like me living in US.

  61. Skylers says:

    Health care is covered by the high tax rate in Canada. And in Metro Vancouver, you get additional transport tax. Whenever they are short on money, you can expect excuses for another tax coming.

  62. Sparky Mahoney says:

    How can you say housing is cheaper when the average land price in Tokyo is something like 13+ grand per sq. ft.? I used to live in Kitsalano myself and just a quick look at real estate there now – man it's just insane – shows the average how price is about 2 million bucks – and half that in Toronto proper but a similar sized place in Tokyo would be about 4 million bucks. Rent sounds way more reasonable as it's very overpriced here for what you get IMO.

  63. momo kyun says:

    https://youtu.be/gFsW8S7Oplg
    how a brazilian couple lives in japan.
    usually brazilian people have better living than english teachers living in old and small apartment. although most of brazilian people work contract manual job in factory.
    they can afford a decent car and can go back to brazil once a year.

  64. JOSE MANUEL RAMIREZ LEON says:

    An example of (housing) market deregulation making prices go down. Not that I think that deregulation is the key to everything, but hey, it has proven to work in this case…

  65. One Two says:

    The Japanese don't accept you.

  66. Buster Biloxi says:

    Great filming but wrong information. Vancouver has a very skewed property market (Yo! Chinese!), not at all like the rest of Canada, so your comments about Canadian homes are inaccurate. Most foreigners in Japan don't live in Tokyo, so your advice only applies to that city. Many other errors. Your video is highly personalized and unhelpful. Canadian. I knew it!

  67. Gamer KS says:

    3:59 I remember Mr.Kamenari from doraemon

  68. Frederic Gardey says:

    Very interesting reporting . has a french married with a japanese , we living in Great britain and when asking Yoko if she would living in japan she let me knows how japan life is busy and she prefers working and living in europe cause here, the life is much more relax . demo, i love so much japan :-)))

  69. crayzeebee says:

    Love your videos. Practical and informative! Just what I've been looking for regarding Japanese daily life. Japan is on my list of places to visit, and so many videos just put a negative or dramatic spin on everything. Yours are right to the heart of information. ❤ I'm not so intimidated to go now!

  70. NoName says:

    0:07 I don't think I've ever seen Deer Lake in a video! 😀

  71. Abbas Soloki says:

    Curious Question, Are you a web developer?

  72. クイン恵 says:

    its cheaper for tou because your neighborhood is a ghetto.

  73. 鈴木大和 says:

    I stayed in Japan alone for a week, aside from accomodation and plane tickets I think Japan cost of living is not that expensive. I can still survive by local street foods, convenience stores, supermarket offers. While the transportation does cost a bit more, I don't mind walking on Japanese streets. Because back in Malaysia where most of the people are heavily depending on private owned cars, even in the bigger cities like Kuala Lumpur, doesn't even have a proper pedestrian walkway, zebra crossings, or bus stops.

  74. Juan David Sinisterra Zapata says:

    Beautiful vancouver! i love you showing the pic of science world and the marina! i too left vancouver bc i have moved to spain with my husband and its nice to know we adjust anywhere we go!

  75. Juan David Sinisterra Zapata says:

    and no joke about the daycare. my younger brother and sister cost a thousand for their day care it was worse when they were younger than 6!

  76. Aiden Burger says:

    It's almost been a year, and a lot can change in that time. Are the majority of the topics covered in the video still true or have things changed? Keep It Up! 🙂

  77. gendut sibuntel says:

    yeah if your salary 500K yen a month you can have a quality of life.how about 200Ks? pay pension,health insurance,resident tax thats already 60 K a month.could you still have quality of life? LOL

  78. Rommel Caritativo says:

    Its cheaper for a canadian to live in japan. What about asian people?

  79. Shafiq Rehman says:

    where im from u can live like a king for a thousand bucks.

  80. reigh lee says:

    hi awesome video! can you share how you moved to japan? were there many papers that need to be accomplished? are you now a dual citizen? i'm so curious, i'm not sure if there's already a video about this , i''m new here. i really want to move but i'm not sure how feasible that is.

  81. GoukenslayWAO says:

    U probably wont make more money in canada now

  82. gumdokim says:

    I want to live in one of those apartments where somebody died, I heard it's cheaper… Sorry, no disrespect to the deceased.

  83. kisakawa fukumura says:

    It's a enjoyable thing to look at your videos: a good voice, well selected background musics, beautiful pictures and videos, and with well selected topics that everyone likes to know. Thank you for making so many good videos.

  84. j stanton Good says:

    This video is interesting but should be self evident from the get- go. You begin by saying you live WITH CHILDREN, in Vancouver. !!! Practically anywhere on earth is cheaper than that!!!! Tokyo has not been terribly expensive for about 10 years. No deep analysis needed. End of discussion.

  85. Screw The Net says:

    NANDATO!? I fell asleep to this lol

  86. Ibrahim mohammed says:

    Honestly, Japan isn’t really that much appealing when u think about it, cultural diversity is pretty much nonexistent. If I live there, I’d feel nauseous

  87. Lucas Fernandez says:

    Of course cost of living is cheaper in Japan than Canada. In Canada you can't buy a house less than 300-400k even in small towns. In America 🇺🇸 we have more houses and lower cost of living.

  88. James says:

    These neighborhoods look so cozy.

  89. jefferee2002 says:

    Healthcare "maybe" costs your family a couple hundred dollars more a month. Sounds insignificant to you. You must be doing well

  90. Nope Offmate says:

    Maybe lax zoning works in Japan, but in rural America, my aunt lived next to a couple of houses, then a drilling firm bought the houses, flattened them, and put a dusty car park there to house their massive drilling trucks and machinery. So every morning at 5 AM she hears those diesel engines fire up. Her town had no zoning laws either. I'm wondering if you don't understand the zoning laws of Japan completely, because there must be more central planning to ensure a physician office / pharmacy / school / grocery store are all within a 5-10 minute walk.

  91. ерунда сэндвич says:

    Good luck making $4000 a month when there are 300 people with master degrees applying for a janitor job lol

  92. Jin Lee says:

    Can wait to visit Japan next year 🤙🤘😅😁📸

  93. C.s.p. says:

    its stupid how much healthcare cost here in the states versus everywhere else.

  94. Ingrid Branyan says:

    I have Type 1 Diabetes. Does anyone have any experience with getting insulin in Japan?

  95. Bim1602 says:

    10 to 15 USD is nothing compared to the German ticket prices. You don't pay for the distance but for the ticket itself. For a train ticket from Essen to Düsseldorf in North Rhine Westphalia (roundabout 30 minutes for each distance) you will pay at least 7.50€ (8.30 USD) for each distance and it gets more expensive every year…😱
    That means that you will pay 15€ or 16.60 USD for roundabout 50 to 60 minutes of traveling.
    And don't think that the German train system is good… It's horrible!
    From the sight of a German, the Japanese train system is cheap compared to Germany's system…😅😓

  96. Aleksandr Vasilenko says:

    Meanwhile, in California, we get nothing and pay a lot for it.

  97. David Smith says:

    Wow it really looks like every anime. They nailed it.

  98. Christophe Leloir says:

    He never said how much he earn from working. Hard to be able to know the price of the live in a country if you don't know how much people earn money from work.

  99. Buzz Tint says:

    Japan is the best place in Asia by far

  100. Aria Dhika Rayendra says:

    I survive with $2-$3 a day (electricity & rent excluded). Yes living like local is very very cheap

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